Engineering

project management
Engineering

A Guide to Understanding Project Management in Engineering

Project management is widely used in engineering and other sectors to guide business operations and processes successfully. It plays a crucial role in helping organisations to achieve goals and meet expectations. To better understand project management, this guide covers all the essentials.

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Engineering

Heat Transfer Basics 

Heat is energy and its nature is to flow from a state of high excitement to one of low excitement. Heat is transferred from a hot place to a cold place by convection, conduction or radiation. This article explains the three modes of heat transfer and provides simple examples of each. Methods to reduce and increase heat transfer are also presented.

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Engineering

Who is Driving Your Leadership Career?

So you want to be a leader! Your leadership career is a journey, and just like any journey, it requires a driver. The question is, who is driving your leadership career? Is it you, or are you letting external forces take the wheel? Taking control of your career is essential for your personal and professional growth. In this article, I will explore the importance of you taking control and offer some insights from my 45 years in the world of work that may help you steer your career in the right direction.

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Engineering

Why Machine Learning and AI Are the Future of Oil Analysis

Oil analysis is essential for maintaining equipment reliability and life span. In this process, data analysts assess whether samples indicate abnormal working surface wear and tear likely to impede performance or shorten specific equipment life span. The problem is, traditional analysis occurs after the fact. By then, signs of wear and tear when finally detected threaten optimal operation and increase the possibility of downtime. 

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Engineering

The 5 Habits of Great Reliability Engineers

Bad or average habits can be hard to break, but the effort to replace them with good or great habits is a valuable investment of time. No matter how often you catch yourself making the mistakes you were trying to avoid, do not be discouraged. The 5 Habits take many years to perfect, but in the end, you will learn better, faster and smarter.

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Engineering

Installations and Inspections of Corner-grounded Systems

Electrical systems are grounded to limit the voltage imposed by lightning, line surges, or unintentional contact with higher voltage lines and to stabilize the voltage to earth during normal operation. Electrical systems can be grounded in several ways. There are induction grounded systems, resistance grounded systems, and high impedance grounded systems among others. The most common grounded system is the solidly grounded system, where there is no intentional grounding impedance in the earthing or grounding circuit.

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Engineering

Some Plain Talk About Nuts and Bolts: Part 1 of 2

When you look over the list of projects you’ve worked on in the last 20 or so years, it’s amazing how many involve fastener problems. Some are relatively easy to solve, especially where careless practices have resulted in fatigue failures. Other problems are much more sophisticated, such as aluminum rivets clamping aluminum sheet metal that failed from galvanic corrosion! In Part 1 of this series, Some Plain Talk About Nuts and Bolts, a Q&A addresses some of the important points connected with common bolting practices.

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Engineering

Internal Clearance & Its Effect on Bearing Fatigue Life

Internal clearance is critical to bearing performance for multiple reasons. The amount of clearance influences the load distribution in a bearing, which ultimately affects bearing life. It also influences bearing running noise and vibration. In addition, it can influence whether the rolling elements move in a rolling or sliding motion.

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Engineering

The Meaning of Bearing Life

Experience shows seemingly identical rolling bearings operated under identical conditions may not last the same amount of time. In most cases, it is impractical to test a statistically significant number of bearings, so engineers rely on standardized bearing-life calculations to select and size bearings for a particular application. These calculations continue to evolve and become more accurate over time, reflecting the collective experience of the bearing industry, including recent advances in manufacturing, tribology, materials, end-user condition monitoring, and computation.

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